Archive | October, 2015
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College Open House at the Morgan Library, Thursday, November 12th, 6:00-8:00 PM!

29 Oct

College Open House at the Morgan Library, Thursday, November 12th, 6:00-8:00 PM!

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Fine Arts Society to Host Internship Panel

29 Oct

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Hey Everyone,

If searching for internships makes you resemble a Munch painting, then FAS has your back. We will be hosting our annual Internship Panel next Wednesday, November 4th at 6:30pm in Silver 301. A series of students will speak about their current internships, how they got them, and their past experiences interning in New York. Some of the internships discussed will include museums, galleries, non-profit organizations, and auction houses. Snacks and refreshments will be served. We hope to see you there!

Other things to check out this weekend!

  • Gladstone Gallery: Richard Prince Cowboy, closes October 30th.

  • Lehmann Maupin (gallery) – Chelsea: Billy Childish flowers, nudes and birch trees: New Paintings 2015, closes October 31st.

Collapsing Disciplines and Distance: Experiments in Japanese Arts in the 1970s, Respondent: Pepe Karmel

29 Oct

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Friday, October 30, 11:30 am–6:30 pm
For specific times and locations, see below

SYMPOSIUM

Collapsing Disciplines and Distance: Experiments in Japanese Arts in the 1970s

Focusing on their interdisciplinary research into a wide range of art practices in Japan from 1968 to 1979, speakers in this symposium will discuss their experiments and methodologies in positioning their work from a global perspective. They will examine the emergence of new approaches to the arts during this period—often referred to as “contemporary” or “information era” and mediated by advanced technology
as well as new materialism.

Gallery Conversations

With Yasufumi Nakamori, curator of the exhibition and associate curator of photography,
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

11:30 am–1:00 pm: Japan Society, 333 East 47th Street
Private tour with bento box lunch. Tickets: $30 non-members/$25 members
Capacity limited. Required RSVP to: www.japansociety.org

2:00–3:00 pm: Grey Art Gallery, NYU, 100 Washington Square East
Free of charge, no reservations, capacity limited.

Sessions
NYU Silver Center, Room 208
(Enter at 32 Waverly Place)
NOTE NEW LOCATION

3:15–4:15 pm: Session 1: New Ways of Seeing: Art, Photography, and Literature

With speakers Yasufumi Nakamori, curator of the exhibition and associate curator of photography,
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Franz Prichard, assistant professor of East Asian Studies, Princeton University; Reiko Tomii, independent scholar and co-founder of PoNJA-GenKon, a listserv group;
and Brett de Bary, professor of Asian Studies and Comparative Literature, Cornell University.

4:30–5:30 pm: Session 2: New Ways of Sensing: Technology, Sound, and Urbanism

With speakers Ann Adachi, executive director, Collaborative Cataloguing Japan; Miki Kaneda, lecturer in Musicology and Ethnomusicology, Boston University; Thomas Looser, associate professor of East Asian Studies, NYU; and Jonathan M. Reynolds, professor of Art History and Architecture, Barnard College.

5:30–6:30 pm: Roundtable discussion moderated by Thomas Looser and Yasufumi Nakamori.
Respondent: Pepe Karmel, associate professor of Art History, NYU.

Co-organized by NYU’s Department of East Asian Studies and Grey Art Gallery,
and co-sponsored by Japan Society.

Free of charge, no reservations, programs subject to change.
Photo ID required for entrance to NYU buildings.

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Offered in conjunction with the exhibition For a New World to Come: Experiments
in Japanese Art and Photography, 1968–1979,
 presented in New York City in two parts:
at the Grey Art Gallery, New York University (September 10–December 7, 2015)
and Japan Society Gallery (October 9, 2015–January 10, 2016).

For more information on the exhibition,
please visit www.nyu.edu/greyart

GALLERY HOURS

Grey Art Gallery, NYU:
Tuesday/Thursday/Friday: 11 am–6 pm
OPEN LATE Wednesday: 11 am–8 pm
Saturday: 11 am–5 pm
Closed Sunday/Monday/Major holidays
www.nyu.edu/greyartgreyartgallery@nyu.edu, 212/998-6780

Japan Society Gallery:
TuesdayThursday, 11 am–6 pm
OPEN LATE Friday: 11 am–9 pm
with free admission 6 pm–9 pm
Saturday–Sunday, 11 am–5 pm
Closed Monday/Major holidays
www.japansociety.org, 212/832-1155

The gallery is accessible to people with disabilities.
For best access, please call 212/998-6780 before visiting.

Image: Takuma Nakahira
From Circulation: Date, Place, Events, 1971
Gelatin silver print
The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, museum purchase
funded by Joan Morgenstern, Peter Lotz, and Photo Forum 2013, 2014.205
© Takuma Nakahira

   

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Book Launch at Casa Italiana

28 Oct

Cox Book Launch

Grey Gallery Conversation With Shelley Rice

28 Oct

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Thursday, October 29, 6:30 pm
NYU Silver Center, Room 300 (enter at 32 Waverly Place)

Conversation

Yasufumi Nakamori, curator of For a New World to Come and associate curator of photography,
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and Shelley Rice, professor of history of photography, NYU, will explore issues in Japanese experimental photography of the 1970s and beyond, in a global context.

Co-sponsored by NYU’s Departments of Art History and Photography & Imaging, and Grey Art Gallery.

Free of charge, no reservations, seating is limited. Photo ID required for entrance to NYU buildings.

*****

Offered in conjunction with the exhibition For a New World to Come: Experiments
in Japanese Art and Photography, 1968–1979,
 presented in New York City in two parts:
at the Grey Art Gallery, New York University (September 10–December 7, 2015)
and Japan Society Gallery (October 9, 2015–January 10, 2016).

For more information on the exhibition,
please visit www.nyu.edu/greyart

GALLERY HOURS

Grey Art Gallery, NYU:
Tuesday/Thursday/Friday: 11 am–6 pm
OPEN LATE Wednesday: 11 am–8 pm
Saturday: 11 am–5 pm
Closed Sunday/Monday/Major holidays
www.nyu.edu/greyartgreyartgallery@nyu.edu, 212/998-6780

Japan Society Gallery:
Tuesday–Thursday, 11 am–6 pm
OPEN LATE Friday: 11 am–9 pm
with free admission 6 pm–9 pm
Saturday–Sunday, 11 am–5 pm
Closed Monday/Major holidays
www.japansociety.org, 212/832-1155

Image: Graphication, no. 5, May 1970
Cover image by Michihiro Kimura
Magazine, 9 5/8 x 9 5/8 x 1/8 in.
Tokyo: Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd.
Courtesy Yokota Shigeru Gallery

   

Street Smart: The Rise of Cities and the Fall of Cars

28 Oct

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Sam Schwartz, Principal, Sam Schwartz Engineering PLLC; former New York City Traffic Commissioner (1982-1986) and First Deputy Commissioner of the New York City Department of Transportation (1987-1990).

Wednesday, November 11, 6:30 pm

New York University Department of Art History

Silver Center, Room 301

100 Washington Square East (entrance on Waverly Place)

On a Saturday morning in December 1973, a section of New York’s West Side Highway collapsed under the weight of a truck full of asphalt. The road was closed, seemingly for good, and the 80,000 cars that traveled it each day had to find a new way to their destinations. It ought to have produced traffic chaos, but it didn’t. The cars simply vanished. It was a moment of revelation: the highway had induced the demand for car travel. It was a classic case of “build it and they will come,” but for the first time the opposite had been shown to be true: knock it down and they will go away. Samuel I. Schwartz was inspired by the lesson. He started to reimagine cities, most of all his beloved New York, freed from their obligation to cars. Eventually, he found, he was not alone.

Since the turn of the twenty-first century, a surreptitious revolution has taken place: every year Americans are driving fewer miles. And the generation named for this new century—the Millennials—are driving least of all. Not because they can’t afford to; they don’t want to. They have better ideas for how to use their streets. An urban transformation is underway, and smart streets are at the heart of it. They will boost property prices and personal fitness, roll back years of congestion and smog, and offer a transformative experience of American urban life. From San Francisco to Salt Lake, Charleston to Houston, the American city is becoming a better and better place to be. Schwartz’s Street Smart is a dazzling and affectionate history of the struggle for control of American cities, and an inspiring off-road map to a more vibrant, active, and vigorous urban future.

Sponsored by the New York University Department of Art History, Urban Design and Architecture Studies

— Free and open to the public —

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Lecture Tonight!

28 Oct

Department of Art History and Institute of Fine Arts alumna Adela Oppenheim will speak on her new exhibition, Ancient Egypt Transformed: The Art of the Middle Kingdom, now showing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art until January 24th, 2016.  You can read Holland Cotter’s recent, terrific review of the show inThe New York Times here.

Oppenheim talk poster