Collapsing Disciplines and Distance: Experiments in Japanese Arts in the 1970s, Respondent: Pepe Karmel

29 Oct

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Friday, October 30, 11:30 am–6:30 pm
For specific times and locations, see below

SYMPOSIUM

Collapsing Disciplines and Distance: Experiments in Japanese Arts in the 1970s

Focusing on their interdisciplinary research into a wide range of art practices in Japan from 1968 to 1979, speakers in this symposium will discuss their experiments and methodologies in positioning their work from a global perspective. They will examine the emergence of new approaches to the arts during this period—often referred to as “contemporary” or “information era” and mediated by advanced technology
as well as new materialism.

Gallery Conversations

With Yasufumi Nakamori, curator of the exhibition and associate curator of photography,
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

11:30 am–1:00 pm: Japan Society, 333 East 47th Street
Private tour with bento box lunch. Tickets: $30 non-members/$25 members
Capacity limited. Required RSVP to: www.japansociety.org

2:00–3:00 pm: Grey Art Gallery, NYU, 100 Washington Square East
Free of charge, no reservations, capacity limited.

Sessions
NYU Silver Center, Room 208
(Enter at 32 Waverly Place)
NOTE NEW LOCATION

3:15–4:15 pm: Session 1: New Ways of Seeing: Art, Photography, and Literature

With speakers Yasufumi Nakamori, curator of the exhibition and associate curator of photography,
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Franz Prichard, assistant professor of East Asian Studies, Princeton University; Reiko Tomii, independent scholar and co-founder of PoNJA-GenKon, a listserv group;
and Brett de Bary, professor of Asian Studies and Comparative Literature, Cornell University.

4:30–5:30 pm: Session 2: New Ways of Sensing: Technology, Sound, and Urbanism

With speakers Ann Adachi, executive director, Collaborative Cataloguing Japan; Miki Kaneda, lecturer in Musicology and Ethnomusicology, Boston University; Thomas Looser, associate professor of East Asian Studies, NYU; and Jonathan M. Reynolds, professor of Art History and Architecture, Barnard College.

5:30–6:30 pm: Roundtable discussion moderated by Thomas Looser and Yasufumi Nakamori.
Respondent: Pepe Karmel, associate professor of Art History, NYU.

Co-organized by NYU’s Department of East Asian Studies and Grey Art Gallery,
and co-sponsored by Japan Society.

Free of charge, no reservations, programs subject to change.
Photo ID required for entrance to NYU buildings.

*****

Offered in conjunction with the exhibition For a New World to Come: Experiments
in Japanese Art and Photography, 1968–1979,
 presented in New York City in two parts:
at the Grey Art Gallery, New York University (September 10–December 7, 2015)
and Japan Society Gallery (October 9, 2015–January 10, 2016).

For more information on the exhibition,
please visit www.nyu.edu/greyart

GALLERY HOURS

Grey Art Gallery, NYU:
Tuesday/Thursday/Friday: 11 am–6 pm
OPEN LATE Wednesday: 11 am–8 pm
Saturday: 11 am–5 pm
Closed Sunday/Monday/Major holidays
www.nyu.edu/greyartgreyartgallery@nyu.edu, 212/998-6780

Japan Society Gallery:
TuesdayThursday, 11 am–6 pm
OPEN LATE Friday: 11 am–9 pm
with free admission 6 pm–9 pm
Saturday–Sunday, 11 am–5 pm
Closed Monday/Major holidays
www.japansociety.org, 212/832-1155

The gallery is accessible to people with disabilities.
For best access, please call 212/998-6780 before visiting.

Image: Takuma Nakahira
From Circulation: Date, Place, Events, 1971
Gelatin silver print
The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, museum purchase
funded by Joan Morgenstern, Peter Lotz, and Photo Forum 2013, 2014.205
© Takuma Nakahira

   

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